Red Hat technology predictions for the year ahead

Redhat LogoAs some businesses think about planning for the new financial year, it is crucial that they keep up with the latest technology trends. Red Hat provides its outlook for the year ahead.

1. BYOD gives way to BYOC. As if IT didn’t have enough to think about when it comes to supporting associates and their phones and tablets of choice, the coming year will continue the internal adoption of both public cloud-based applications (including SaaS) and in-house deployments of private clouds targeted at specific use cases. This will give way to a whole new set of integration and support challenges for IT.
– Brian Stevens, executive vice president and CTO, Red Hat

2. The cloud will be hybrid. “Traditional” infrastructure deployments are losing ground to hybrid deployments that include virtual and cloud infrastructure. When it comes to new applications, this trend will only accelerate in 2014. During development, companies will increasingly seek to use Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS) and Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) to rapidly build, deploy, and scale applications.

– Mark Coggin, senior director, Product Marketing, Platform, Red Hat

3. Open source offerings will continue to cut into proprietary market share. In 2014 there will be more credible enterprise options for open and interoperable solutions. There will also be a continued growth of KVM (Kernel-based virtual machine) and other open source virtualisation technologies. Also, the use of technologies like OpenStack, which are more cloud-focused, continue to grow.
– Chuck Dubuque, director, Product Marketing, Virtualization and OpenStack, Red Hat

4. Convergence will lead us to the Business-Driven Cloud. Red Hat sees the integration of business rules, cloud management and cloud infrastructure platforms enabling the Business-Driven Cloud (BDC). Decisions about cost, service levels and resource allocation will therefore move up to the business owners.
Bryan Che, general manager, Red Hat CloudForms

5. Compute and storage convergence will force the overhaul of IT operations. With private cloud and SaaS environments proliferating in enterprises worldwide, the integration of compute, networking and storage infrastructure is changing the way technology services are defined, enabled and delivered. This will necessitate re-thinking of core IT tools, principles and staffing to support the converged infrastructure.
– Ranga Rangachari, vice president and general manager, Storage, Red Hat

6. Government agencies will increase their focus on infrastructure management. This year, Australian government agencies will increase the rate of virtualisation and movement to private and public clouds. As a result, they will allocate more resources towards new solutions for managing and orchestrating their infrastructures. While several government agencies have already started the virtualisation process, over the next year, many more will move to public clouds and adopt virtualised networking and storage solutions.
– Gunnar Hellekson, Chief Technology Strategist, U.S. Public Sector, Red Hat

7. Big data moves from batch to real-time response. Consumers and businesses alike are creating data at an amazing rate. By some estimates, the world’s generated data is doubling every two years*. Turning a problem upside down, the industry is learning how to extract knowledge from these massive data stores, and using it to shape many aspects of their business.
– Brian Stevens, executive vice president and CTO, Red Hat

8. Services and tools for cloud visibility and controlled access on the rise. In 2014, visibility into cloud is going to be the key to security. Businesses will want more visibility into how cloud works – whether it is infrastructure or PaaS. Right now the cloud is still in a “black box” sort of state where users don’t know or understand what’s happening. 2014 will focus on services or tools that enable visibility as well as setting up controlled access.
– Krishnan Subramanian, director, OpenShift strategy, Red Hat

9. A year of challenge and change. 2014 is going to be a year of challenge and change. Many businesses have already embraced change, adopted new business models and are thriving despite the global economic conditions in which we operate. They have already created their competitive differentiation and have already moved to where their customers want to be in the future.
– Max McClaren, general manager, Red Hat Australia

Reference
* http://www.emc.com/leadership/programs/digital-universe.htm

 

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