CompTIA IT Industry Outlook 2020: ‘Tricky balancing act’ ahead as industry enters a new decade

Leading industry association project 3.7 per cent industry growth in 2020; identifies 10 trends to watch in the year ahead

The global information technology (IT) industry heads into 2020 balancing its drive to produce new products and services while addressing issues that are often byproducts of innovation, according to the IT Industry Outlook 2020 report from CompTIA, the industry’s leading trade association.

Moving past the hype surrounding emerging technologies and honing in on value-driven real business use cases; making cybersecurity a top of mind business consideration rather than a technology task; and melding artificial intelligence and automation into the workplace without eliminating the human element are just some of the challenges ahead for the industry identified in the CompTIA report.

CompTIA projects the global IT industry will grow at a rate of 3.7 per cent in 2020, with upside potential in the 5.4 per cent range and a downside floor of 1.9 per cent.

Seth Robinson, senior director and industry analysis, CompTIA said, “This is a narrower forecast range than what we’ve seen in past years, suggesting industry executives are exercising a relatively high degree of caution in an unpredictable environment.”

CompTIA uses a consensus forecasting approach. This “wisdom of the crowds” model attempts to balance the opinions of large IT firms with small IT firms, as well as optimistic opinions with pessimistic opinions, to come up with a “best-fit forecast” that reflects the sentiment of industry executives.

CompTIA’s 10 trends to watch in 2020

CompTIA’s IT Industry Outlook 2020 also provides insight into 10 trends that will shape the IT industry, its workforce, and its business models in the coming year.

1. Tech-washing fades in favor of real strategy
2. Workforce diversity grows in many ways
3. Tech topics are front and centre in U.S. elections
4. Hype meets reality with emerging technology
5. Internet of Things continues to redefine IT architecture
6. Artificial intelligence eats the world
7. Demand for integration leads to demand for automation
8. Cybersecurity becomes more operational
9. Deep fakes and 5G exacerbate the data management challenge
10. Tech industry regulation stirs fears

Seth Robinson said, “Trends tend to unfold in a step-like manner. Some of the trends we’ve highlighted are in their early stages while others are approaching market-ready maturity. Similarly, any single trend will impact organisations at different times and in different ways.”

The view from the IT channel

Companies involved in the selling of technology products and services can anticipate another year of change and complexity in 2020. Factors that have altered the selling and buying process over the last several years (competition from new market entrants, more options for customers to choose from) will remain in play.

Carolyn April, senior director and industry analysis, CompTIA said, “The channel firms that manage to thrive will be the ones who invest in skills training, expand their market reach to new customers and verticals, partner with potential competitors, and embrace emerging tech. For many, this will mean getting out of their comfort zone.”

IT pros optimistic

IT professionals head into the new year with optimistic feelings about their roles in the industry. Among IT pros in Australia and New Zealand, 82 per cent rate their outlook as good or very good. Technology workers in other countries and regions expressed similar positive sentiments: 81 per cent in Canada, 75 per cent in the United Kingdom, 86 per cent in the United States and 85 per cent in the Benelux region (Belgium/Netherlands/Luxembourg).

The high demand for technology skills, which in turn leads to robust career options, is the top reason for optimism. There’s also a sense that the importance of technology to business objectives makes technology a more integral part of business operations, giving IT pros an opportunity to play a larger role in the direction of the organisation.

The complete IT Industry Outlook 2020 report is available at https://www.comptia.org/content/research/it-industry-trends-analysis. For all the latest news from CompTIA visit https://www.comptia.org/newsroom.

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About CompTIA
The Computing Technology Industry Association (CompTIA) is a leading voice and advocate for the $5 trillion global information technology ecosystem; and the more than 50 million industry and tech professionals who design, implement, manage, and safeguard the technology that powers the world’s economy. Through education, training, certifications, advocacy, philanthropy, and market research, CompTIA is the hub for advancing the tech industry and its workforce. Visit www.comptia.org to learn more.

New CompTIA Report tracks Australian teenagers’ thoughts on technology usage and careers

Nearly half of teens say they would consider a career in tech, but perceived barriers and lack of career information persist

Sydney – New research published by CompTIA, the leading trade association for the global technology industry, finds that teenagers in Australia believe that technology is generally moving in a positive direction and is a force for good that will play an even greater role in their lives as they grow older.

The CompTIA report “International Youth Perspectives of Technology and Careers” reveals that 45 per cent of the Australian teenagers surveyed would consider a career in technology, compared to 50 per cent globally. Australian teens are generally positive about what a job in tech entails; solving problems, doing work that’s interesting and fun and earning a good salary.

But the survey also finds that barriers are still in place that may be keeping even more young people from looking at the technology field as a profession. More than 1,500 teenagers between the ages of 13 and 18 from 11 different countries (1) participated in the online survey.

“It’s encouraging to see that a sizeable percentage of young people see tech as a viable career option,” said Todd Thibodeaux, president and CEO, CompTIA. “But it’s also quite apparent that we still have work to do to correct misperceptions about tech occupations and to provide career instruction and resources that reflect the reality of the 21st Century tech workforce.”

For example, the data shows that 35 per cent of Australian teenagers are of the opinion that they lack the preparation and exposure to technology in high school or college that would prepare them for a career. A like percentage believe there are limited job opportunities in technology in their local area. Slightly more than one-quarter of teens cite the lack of affordable schooling and training options; and feel the technology field is too competitive and difficult to enter.

The report also confirms that gender bias is still present when it comes to career advice. Boys in Australia received notably higher levels of encouragement from parents, teachers, peers and other to consider a career in tech than girls did (55 per cent vs. 33 per cent).

When teens were asked about specific career opportunities in tech, the most popular choices were designing video games, working in emerging technologies, such as robotics, running a tech business and working in cybersecurity.

“These are all great career choices, but there are many more job roles in tech that provide the opportunity to earn a good salary, take on new and greater responsibilities and, most importantly, have a positive impact on society,” Thibodeaux said. “We need to expand our outreach to get that message out to the next generations of workers.”

To aid in the education effort, CompTIA has created The Future of Tech, a free and growing library of resources designed for anyone interested in learning about new and what’s next in technology.

CompTIA’s Australia New Zealand (ANZ) Channel Community also recently launched a new initiative to train and certify 3,000 students in the fundamentals of technology. Free courseware materials and certification exam vouchers will be made available to 3,000 students age 25 and under in Australia and New Zealand. More information on the program is available at https://www.land.certification.comptia.org/ITFANZ.

Interacting with technology

Among Australian teenagers, 54 per cent generally believe that technology in a positive direction compared to 13 per cent who feel that tech is heading in a negative direction and 33 per cent who are unsure. The corresponding global figures are 54 per cent positive, 11 per cent negative and 35 per cent unsure.

Factors contributing to the positive feelings include the expectations that innovation and technology breakthroughs could drastically improve lives; offer more choices to meet the needs of just about everyone; produce apps and devices that are faster, better and more feature rich; and narrow the “digital divide” by providing access to more information and services to more people.

A majority of young people (69 per cent) report seeing or hearing something about automating technologies and the future of work. They also expressed a degree of concern over the uncertainty of automation.

“Teens astutely anticipate the need for more training and hands-on experience in various technology disciplines to ensure that they are well positioned for the workplace of tomorrow,” said Anna Matthai, senior manager, research and market intelligence, CompTIA.

To access a free copy of the full report “International Youth Perspectives of Technology and Careers” visit https://comptiacdn.azureedge.net/webcontent/docs/default-source/research-reports/comptia-international-youth-technology-and-career-perceptions.pdf?sfvrsn=f0dfb41e_2.

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About CompTIA
The Computing Technology Industry Association (CompTIA) is a leading voice and advocate for the $5 trillion global information technology ecosystem; and the more than 50 million industry and tech professionals who design, implement, manage, and safeguard the technology that powers the world’s economy. Through education, training, certifications, advocacy, philanthropy, and market research, CompTIA is the hub for advancing the tech industry and its workforce. Visit www.comptia.org to learn more.

References: 

(1) Australia, Brazil, Canada, India, Japan, Netherlands, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom and United States.

CompTIA and its ANZ Channel Community launch major new initiative to teach students the fundamentals of technology

 

Association will provide 3,000 students with free training and certification exam vouchers

Sydney, AustraliaCompTIA, the leading trade association for the global technology industry, and its Australia New Zealand (ANZ) Channel Community are expanding its commitment to the region with a new initiative to train and certify 3,000 students in the fundamentals of technology.

Free courseware materials and certification exam vouchers will be made available to 3,000 students age 25 and under in Australia and New Zealand. The goal is to have the students become certified in CompTIA IT Fundamentals, a pre-career professional certification that introduces them to basic technology knowledge and skills to help them decide if a career in tech is right for them.

“From day one our commitment has been to work with the technology community across the region to help the industry advance, companies grow and individuals thrive in their careers,” said Nancy Hammervik, executive vice president for industry relations at CompTIA. “Today we’re taking the next step; to bring a new generation of entrepreneurs, innovators and technologists into our community.”

Members of the CompTIA ANZ Channel Community will leverage their professional networks to bring students and educational institutions into the program. CompTIA partners are also encouraged to get involved, as are individual students. More information on the program is available at https://www.land.certification.comptia.org/ITFANZ.

“The technology field is rich with career opportunities, whether you work for an ICT company or in another industry that relies on tech to conduct its business,” said James Bergl, APAC regional director for Datto, a leading provider of IT solutions delivered by managed service providers and chair of the CompTIA ANZ Channel Community.

“But getting that message out to young people who are beginning to think about their career options has been a major challenge for our industry,” Bergl continued. “Our free training and certification program will address that issue head on.”

“This campaign comes at a crucial time for our industry,” added Daniel Johns, head of services for ASI Solutions, a leading Australian privately-owned ICT company and vice chair of the CompTIA community. “Companies continue to seek out new tech talent to fill existing employment shortages and to expand into new areas of emerging technologies.”

In Australia, government research shows an annual increase of 21.5 percent in the demand for information and communications technology professionals; some 11,600 job openings per year.

Similarly, the tech industry is a major and growing sector in New Zealand, with exports reaching $950 million in 2016 and the industry growing at an estimated 12 percent per year.

Eligible students who participate in the program will receive free video training and a self-study e-book, as well as a complimentary exam voucher to take the test to become certified in CompTIA IT Fundamentals.

“The CompTIA IT Fundamentals curriculum allows students to explore the foundations of technology, creating a better understanding and mastery of basic digital skills,” said Loraine Vorster, vice president for business development at CompTIA. “For some, this will serve as a launching pad for a career in tech. Others will be well grounded in the fundamentals of tech that will serve them well in any career they choose to pursue.”

Students interested in the program can apply at: https://www.land.certification.comptia.org/ITFANZ.

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About CompTIA
The Computing Technology Industry Association (CompTIA) is a leading voice and advocate for the $5 trillion global information technology ecosystem; and the more than 50 million industry and tech professionals who design, implement, manage, and safeguard the technology that powers the world’s economy. Through education, training, certifications, advocacy, philanthropy, and market research, CompTIA is the hub for advancing the tech industry and its workforce. Visit www.comptia.org to learn more.

CompTIA IT Industry Outlook 2019: ‘Next Big Thing’ gives way to fusion of technology building blocks, people and processes

CompTIA IT Industry Outlook 2019: ‘Next big thing’ gives way to fusion of technology building blocks, people and processes

Leading tech industry trade association projects four per cent industry growth in 2019; identifies 12 trends to watch

Sydney, Australia – The pace, scope, and accessibility of innovation today provides organisations an ever-expanding array of digital transformation tools; but it also brings new challenges in orchestrating technology, people, and process. This is one of the key themes explored in the “IT Industry Outlook 2019,” the annual report published by CompTIA, the leading association for the global tech industry.

On the strength of this innovation, CompTIA projects global industry growth of 4 per cent, with upside potential of 6.4 per cent. Conversely, an economic slowdown, exacerbated by international trade turmoil, could push the growth forecast to its low-end projection of 1.5 per cent.

“It’s an exciting time as we embark on the next wave of innovation. Technology is more accessible than ever; and there are more opportunities to use technology to build and grow organisations,” said Todd Thibodeaux, president and CEO, CompTIA.

“While the potential is great, the challenges and anxieties are great, too,” Thibodeaux continued. “Our mission is to work with the tech community, and the workforce of today and tomorrow, to turn the possibilities of innovation into the realities of real-word benefits for the users of technology.”

Among factors cited by industry executives surveyed by CompTIA that will help drive growth in the year ahead is their ability to reach new customer segments, and successfully selling new business lines and launching new products, such as in emerging technology areas.

CompTIA’s IT Industry Business Confidence Index remains in solidly positive territory, but there are a number of concerns on the minds of industry executives. Beyond the usual concern over customer spending weakness, executives cited the possibility of an unexpected shock, such as a financial crisis, government turmoil, and margin pressure as factors that could hinder growth.

CompTIA’s 12 trends to watch in 2019

CompTIA’s ‘IT Industry Outlook 2019’ explores 12 trends shaping the tech landscape, its workforce, and its business models in the year ahead.

1. Cloud, edge and 5G form the modern economic infrastructure
2. IoT and AI open new possibilities in ambient computing
3. Distributed technology models challenge existing structures
4. Stackable technologies supercharge digitisation efforts
5. Business of emerging technology prompts sales channels reinvention
6. Hyper-personalisation takes customer experience to next level
7. Partnerships bridge gaps in new tech ecosystem
8. Persistent tech-worker shortages fuel new, creative solutions
9. Digital-human models begin to shape the workplace of tomorrow
10. Technology professionals take the lead in anticipating unintended consequences
11. High tech increasingly transforms low tech
12. Global tech hubs put spotlight on the ingredients for innovation

“This year’s trends reaffirm the importance of thinking about technology holistically,” said Tim Herbert, senior vice president for research and market intelligence at CompTIA. “While discussions of ‘the next big thing have their place, the practical reality for most organisations is the need to understand how technology building blocks spanning infrastructure, applications, data, and as-a-service models fit together.”

The complete report is available at https://www.comptia.org/resources/it-industry-trends-analysis.

About CompTIA
The Computing Technology Industry Association (CompTIA) is a leading voice and advocate for the $5 trillion global information technology ecosystem; and the more than 50 million industry and tech professionals who design, implement, manage, and safeguard the technology that powers the world’s economy. Through education, training, certifications, advocacy, philanthropy, and market research, CompTIA is the hub for advancing the tech industry and its workforce.

CompTIA announces new Executive Council members

Sydney, Australia – CompTIA has announced its four new executive council (EC) members for 2019, set to help shape the channel community in the new year and beyond. The newly-elected members were decided by a vote by CompTIA Premier Members.

The newly-elected EC members are:

  1. Carineh Grigorian, marketing director, Arrow ECS ANZ
  2. Damian Zammit, general manager, Thomas Duryea Logicalis
  3. Jo Dean, manager, SMB and Distribution Sales, Citrix Systems
  4. Leo Lynch, ANZ sales director, StorageCraft.

Moheb Moses, director, Channel Dynamics, and ANZ community director, CompTIA, said “This year’s race was extremely competitive. We had eight nominees in total, all highly skilled and active in the industry. CompTIA originally planned to fill five open positions, however, the existing EC chose to reserve a position for a New Zealand candidate. This will help CompTIA expand its coverage in the future.

“I also want to extend a heartfelt thank you to CompTIA’s outgoing EC members, who’ve been outstanding contributors to our community. These members’ work and assistance have helped significantly strengthen the channel community.”

Outgoing EC members include:

  1. Karen Drewitt, general manager, The Missing Link (chair)
  2. Nick Beaugeard, CEO, HubOne (vice chair)
  3. Belinda Jurisic, channel sales manager, Citrix
  4. Sean Murphy, owner, Nexus IT
  5. Emma Tomlin, strategic market development manager, Microsoft.

About CompTIA

The Computing Technology Industry Association (CompTIA) is the world’s leading technology association. With approximately 2,000 member companies, 3,000 academic and training partners, 100,000-plus registered users and more than two million IT certifications issued to technology professionals, CompTIA is dedicated to advancing industry growth through education and training programs, market intelligence and research, networking events, professional certifications and public advocacy. Visit CompTIA online, Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter to learn more.

CompTIA emerging technology community aims to separate reality from hype; identifies 10 tech trends to watch

From Internet of Things to artificial intelligence, these innovations have the greatest potential to make near-term impacts on business

Sydney, Australia – The newest member community established by CompTIA, the leading trade association for the global technology industry, is encouraging the adoption of new and emerging technologies to improve business outcomes, but in a rational, thoughtful way that makes sense for tech companies and their customers alike.

The CompTIA Emerging Technology Community includes industry executives and thought leaders who have both a keen sense of new technologies, and insight into how to create business opportunities and transform business operations.

“It’s an exciting time for innovation on many fronts,” said Estelle Johannes, CompTIA’s staff liaison to the community. “The challenge for many organisations is to separate hype from reality, and to identify those new technologies that make the most sense for them. We’ve recruited some of the brightest minds in our industry to help lead that effort.”

Among all the innovations generating a buzz in 2018, community leaders have identified 10 with the potential to make the greatest immediate impact on business operations for customers and to create business opportunities for IT channel companies.

  1. Internet of Things
  2. Automation
  3. Artificial Intelligence
  4. Augmented Reality / Virtual Reality
  5. 5G Wireless
  6. 3D Printing
  7. Drones
  8. Biometrics
  9. Blockchain
  10. Quantum Computing

“The channel is looking to cut through the consumer hype and build practices around those technologies that provide near-term and profitable extensions to their businesses,” said Jay McBain, principal analyst, global channels, Forrester, and vice chairman of the CompTIA Emerging Technology Community. ”These 10 technologies were stack-ranked by partners who are engaging with customers and finding interesting niches in the market.”

“Emerging technologies are changing the business landscape and enabling people and organisations to engage, learn, serve and grow in new ways,” said Scott Zahl, executive director, global partner enablement, Ingram Micro Inc., and member of the Emerging Technology Community. “These technologies are transformative and bring with them a tremendous opportunity for the channel to lead and serve as the trusted advisor.”

The CompTIA Emerging Technology Community is chaired by Michael Haines, director of partner incentive strategy and program design at Microsoft.

Other members of the community’s leadership group are Ted Cole, vice president, partner optimiser relationships, SaaSMAX; Paul Cronin, facilitator of excellence, Cronin Corp. Business Consulting; Suzanne Edwards, CEO, Enlighten; Julia Moiseeva, director, FinTest, Ltd.; and David Tan, chief technology officer and co-founder, CrushBank.

The community is developing guidance for organisations on the factors to consider when contemplating which emerging technologies are best for them, whether as a seller of technology solutions or as a consumer of emerging tech. This includes examining the competencies and dependencies that they will need to know before they can properly engage with emerging technologies.

The group’s top 10 list is available in both infographic and video formats.

To learn more about the CompTIA Emerging Technology Community or to get involved with the group visit https://www.comptia.org/communities/emerging-technology.

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About CompTIA

The Computing Technology Industry Association (CompTIA) is a leading voice and advocate for the $4.8 trillion global information technology ecosystem; and the more than 35 million industry and tech professionals who design, implement, manage, and safeguard the technology that powers the world’s economy. Through education, training, certifications, advocacy, philanthropy, and market research, CompTIA is the hub for advancing the tech industry and its workforce. Visit www.comptia.org to learn more.

Australian Co-operation Legal Agreement and Australian Non-Disclosure Legal Agreement templates from CompTIA now available for Premier Members

Sydney, Australia – CompTIA and its ANZ Channel Community have announced the availability of the Australian Co-operation Legal Agreement and the Australian Non-Disclosure Legal Agreement for Premier Members.

The Australian Co-operation Legal Agreement is for businesses establishing a formal business relationship with another individual, group or entity in Australia. This template is a complete document for businesses to develop a formal co-operational agreement between parties involved in conducting a business relationship.

The Australian Non-Disclosure Legal Agreement is for businesses establishing a formal business connection in which a party may disclose its confidential information with another individual, group or entity in Australia. It is a complete template for businesses to develop a formal agreement between parties involved in conducting a business relationship.

‎Moheb Moses, director, Channel Dynamics, and ANZ community director, CompTIA, said, “The aim of creating legal template documents such as these is to provide additional value to members, and is part of the benefit of becoming a Premier Member. CompTIA engaged an experienced local solicitor to make sure the documents comply with Australian law so that businesses can be confident that their legal agreement meets the unique needs of IT companies in Australia.

The resources that have been collated to date for Australian businesses go a long way toward providing a comprehensive, easy-to-use library to help MSPs with the legal issues which arise in day-to-day business operations.”

Locally, CompTIA has now produced Australian localised versions of the Co-operation Legal Agreement, Master Professional Services Legal Agreement, Managed Services Agreement, Non-Disclosure Legal Agreement, and the Quick Start Guide to Building a Managed Services Sales Team, demonstrating its continued commitment to delivering resources that help members in their businesses.

Visit CompTIA to become a Premier Member and access the new templates now. For a limited time, ANZ MSPs can become Premier Members for just US$149 (normally US$350) using the code SPAU.

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About CompTIA

The Computing Technology Industry Association (CompTIA) is a leading voice and advocate for the $4.8 trillion global information technology ecosystem; and the more than seven million technology professionals, who design, implement, manage, and safeguard the technology that powers the U.S. economy. Through education, training, certifications, advocacy, philanthropy, and market research, CompTIA is the hub for advancing the tech industry and its workforce. Visit www.comptia.org to learn more.

CompTIA Board sees mixed signals emanating from IT channel

Opportunities to expand customer engagement and boost profitability countered by abundance of product and service options and tight labour market

Sydney, Australia – Technology companies have seized opportunities to expand their engagement with customers outside the IT department and to find new ways to boost profitability, according to the Board of Directors of CompTIA, the leading trade association for the global technology industry.

But challenges – many related to workforce considerations – are keeping tech firms from making even greater progress, the association’s Directors say.

The discussion on the current and future state of the market took place during a meeting at the recent CompTIA ChannelCon 2018 conference.

Board members said one of the most positive signs coming from the market is the progress companies are making to expand their engagement with customers.

Companies in all layers of the channel are gaining footholds and cementing relationships with decision-makers in marketing, HR, accounting, operations, and other departments and team that are engaged in the evaluation and purchase of technology solutions. With greater insight into the operations and objectives of individual business units and departments, technology providers are better able to create specific solutions to meet the unique needs of each customer.

Many companies are embracing specialisation in their own portfolios of technology solutions. The movement to the cloud and to extensible platforms has prompted them to engage in the development of proprietary intellectual property, turning some managed service providers into independent software vendors and boosting profitability.

The CompTIA Board of Directors identified the following areas as other current industry trend that are impacting business.

Customer Spending: As the economy has improved, more customers are spending money on technologies that don’t necessarily result in an immediate return on investment but will prepare them for future growth and profitability. Software defined networks and unified communications are two examples.

Voice: The market is experiencing rapid advancement in the buildout of voice-based solutions in many product areas. Having made tremendous inroads in customer service, these new solutions look to simplify products for customers in their day-to-day usage.

More Options: The expanding variety of options for tech products and services is a boom for some companies, but it’s creating challenges for others. Even some of the largest technology vendors are confused about their go-to-market strategies. Wide variances in margins have clouded decisions about which products and services to emphasise.

Speed to Market: In some instances, the quality of products and services is suffering because the window to bring new solutions to market is as small as it’s ever been.

What’s Old is New: Some companies are reverting back to “break-fix” services as a contributor to the financial bottom line. This is true for progressive companies that have identified new service niches; and those challenged by shrinking profit margins in cloud services.

Workforce Woes: Workforce challenges related to the tight job market are a concern. According to the latest “CompTIA IT Employment Tracker” the July unemployment rate for IT occupations was 1.9 percent, one of the lowest rates across all occupation categories. For some companies, this has resulted in an uptick in staff turnover among IT support technicians and other job categories. Finding workers will skillsets in consultative selling, cybersecurity and product integration remains problematic. Other employers are balking at investments in training for incumbent employees out of fear that a worker who’s trained in new skills will leave the company for a new opportunity.

State of Security: There is confusion in the market about how companies should incorporate the recommendation of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Cybersecurity Framework. Customers don’t understand which elements of the framework are “must haves” and which are “nice to have.” This has placed an additional burden on MSPs and vendors, who must train their sales teams on many possible combinations.

MSP vs. MSSP: Market confusion also persists about the differences between a managed services provider (MSP) and a managed security services provider (MSSP). Without clear definitions, companies don’t know where they fit in the spectrum, which limits opportunities and clouds focus.

International Scene: Outside the major economies, MSPs are building business models similar to what emerged in the U.S. market over the past decade, with heavy reliance on usage-based consumption pricing.

M&A Activity: The channel continues to see a huge amount of merger and acquisition activity. The impact or private equity have never been bigger. But as large rollups occur due to consolidation, there is some concern over the lack of transparency over what happens, or could happen, if private equity dollars disappear.

Current members of the CompTIA Board of Directors include Chairwoman Amy Kardel, president and co-founder, Clever Ducks; Vice Chair Quy “Q” Nguyen, founder and CEO, Allyance Communications Inc.; Vice Chair Gordon Pelosse, vice president, technology support delivery Canada, Hewlett Packard Enterprises; MJ Shoer, director of client engagement and virtual CIO, Onepath; James Afdahl, vice president, business services and state relationship manager, GED Testing Service; Scott Barlow, vice president of global MSP, Sophos, Inc.; Toni Clayton-Hine, senior vice president and chief marketing officer, Xerox Corporation; Eric Hughes, chief operating officer, Intigry, Inc.; Jason Magee, chief operating officer, ConnectWise; Tracy Pound. managing director, MaximITy; John Scola, global vice president, cloud channels and strategy lead, SAP; Dan Shapero, president, TeamLogic IT; and Raja K. Singh, principal architect, advanced solutions and emerging technologies, Verizon.

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About CompTIA

The Computing Technology Industry Association (CompTIA) is a leading voice and advocate for the $4.8 trillion global information technology ecosystem; and the more than 35 million industry and tech professionals who design, implement, manage, and safeguard the technology that powers the world’s economy. Through education, training, certifications, advocacy, philanthropy, and market research, CompTIA is the hub for advancing the tech industry and its workforce. Visit www.comptia.org to learn more.

CompTIA invites technology workers around the world to share #MyTechStory

Leading industry association aims to inspire young people to explore tech career options

Sydney, AustraliaCompTIA, the world’s leading technology association, is encouraging tech workers around the world to join its #MyTechStory campaign to inspire the next generations of entrepreneurs and innovators.

Starting at CompTIA ChannelCon 2018, the industry’s premier annual education, networking and partnering event, anyone working in a technology job or for a tech company is invited to share #MyTechStory in a three- to five-minute video clip.

“The people in our industry have great stories to tell,” Todd Thibodeaux, CompTIA president and CEO, said. ”We need to pass those down to younger generations. We still have 600,000 open jobs in our industry. If we are ever going to fill that we need to attract new people.”

Thibodeaux shared his tech story with the ChannelCon audience; from building Erector Sets and Heathkit electronic devices as an adolescent; to his first computer, the ZX81 home computer produced by Sinclair Research in the early 1980s; through five colleges and universities; to 2018, his tenth year as the leader of the world’s leading technology industry trade association.

“Tell the world about why you love the job you have,” Thibodeaux said. “It might be a role model who inspired you, or an innovation that intrigued you. And if you arrived in the tech industry after a long and winding career path, we want to hear your story, too. Everyone has a unique tale to tell, a story that can encourage or inspire someone else.”

CompTIA invites anyone with a connection to the technology industry workforce – whether in a technical or non-technical job role – to share their tech story in a short video of five minutes or less.

Completed videos can be tweeted to @CompTIA using #MyTechStory; or submitted via email to kstone@comptia.org.

Later this year CompTIA will unveil a video library of the #MyTechStory submissions.

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About CompTIA

The Computing Technology Industry Association (CompTIA) is a leading voice and advocate for the $4.8 trillion global information technology ecosystem; and the more than 35 million industry and tech professionals who design, implement, manage, and safeguard the technology that powers the world’s economy. Through education, training, certifications, advocacy, philanthropy, and market research, CompTIA is the hub for advancing the tech industry and its workforce. Visit www.comptia.org to learn more.

CompTIA member communities and councils donate $190K to tech-related charities this year

Sydney, AustraliaCompTIA’s member communities and councils chose 19 technology-related charities in Australia, Canada, the U.K. and the U.S. to give $190,000 in donations this year. ChickTech and NPower will receive the largest of those donations at $50,000 and $25,000 respectively.

As part of CompTIA Giving, contributions made by CompTIA’s member communities and councils support local communities and improve education and career options for individuals in need. CompTIA Giving designates $10,000 for each of CompTIA’s 19 communities and councils to give to their own chosen charities each year. Each community and council can give the full $10,000 to one charity or split it among two charities.

“CompTIA’s members bond together in an open environment to build the tech future and the workforce that our industry needs,” said Meredith Caram, assistant vice president, channel marketing, AT&T Business, and a representative of CompTIA’s Community Executive Board. “Each of these 19 charities chosen by our member communities and councils shows how technology solves local and global challenges and boosts the dreams and capabilities of the individuals they serve. I’m honored to be part of an association that pays it forward every day and thrilled to support our selected charities.”

The following charities have been selected by CompTIA’s member communities and councils for donations this year:

  • Ability Net provides high-quality paid-for and free services that help disabled people in the U.K. succeed at work, at home and in education.
  • Black Tech Mecca works to ensure black people are full participants in the global technology sector by providing content and programs that broaden perspectives and shift the conversation to highlight stories of tech innovation and success.
  • Computing Alliance of Hispanic-Serving Institutions, part of The University of Texas El Paso, aims to increase the number of Hispanics who pursue and complete baccalaureate and advanced degrees in computing areas.
  • ChickTech works to retain women in the technology workforce and increase the number of women and girls pursuing technology-based careers.
  • Code.org is dedicated to expanding access to computer science in schools and increasing participation by women and underrepresented minorities.
  • Coder Dojo in Australia is part of an open source, volunteer led, global movement of free coding clubs for young kids.
  • Digital Harbor Foundation offers programs to meet and enhance STEM teaching standards and lead youth to college and career readiness, encourage self-efficacy and build lifelong learning strategies.
  • Federation of Galaxy Explorers inspires youth in the fields of science and engineering by providing afterschool “mission team” meetings where students participate in hands-on lessons that support the National Science Education Standards.
  • Folds of Honor provides educational support to spouses and children of America’s fallen and wounded soldiers.
  • Girls Who Code aims to support and increase the number of women in computer science and is working to close the gender gap in technology and change the image of what a programmer looks like and does.
  • Hire Heroes provides free, expert career coaching and job sourcing to transitioning U.S. military members, veterans and military spouses.
  • Junior Achievement USA of Eastern Iowa empowers youth and creates robust communities by fostering work-readiness, entrepreneurship and financial literacy skills, and using experiential learning to inspire students to dream big and reach their potential.
  • Kids Help Phone is a counseling center for Canadian kids which promises to listen without judgment 24/7.
  • Kids, Cops and Computers in Canada helps deserving yet financially disadvantaged kids access the technology and tools they need to achieve their academic and social potential.
  • National Center for Missing and Exploited Children helps find missing children, reduce child sexual exploitation, and prevent child victimisation.
  • NPower assists under-represented talent to pursue tech futures by teaching the digital and professional skills demanded by the marketplace and engaging corporations, volunteers and nonprofits in the success of its students.
  • New York University School of Engineering Robotic Design Team is a collegiate research and design team at New York University’s Tandon School of Engineering that competes in various university robotics competitions and promotes STEM education in its local community.
  • Project Tomorrow is an education nonprofit group dedicated to ensuring that K-12 students are well prepared to become tomorrow’s leaders, innovators and engaged citizens of the world.
  • Teen Tech helps teenagers in the U.K. see the wide range of career possibilities in science, engineering and technology.

“For the past six years, while building our own social innovation programs to put future workers into tech careers, we’ve also supported more than 70 charities chosen by CompTIA member communities and councils with $920,000 in donations,” said Charles Eaton, executive vice president, social innovation, CompTIA. “CompTIA has committed to annually donate at least five percent of its revenues to philanthropy and social innovation, a commitment of $3 million.”

CompTIA divides its philanthropic efforts along three main lines: 1) CompTIA Giving which gives money and staff time to tech-related charities; 2) NextUp, a campaign to introduce tech careers to teenagers; and 3) Creating IT Futures, which researches and develops workforce development and STEM education programs to build new pathways to IT careers.

More information about CompTIA’s member communities and councils and their activities can be found at https://www.comptia.org/communities. Charities that would like to be considered for future gifts should send their information to Amanda Romadka, aromadka@comptia.org.

About CompTIA

The Computing Technology Industry Association (CompTIA) is a leading voice and advocate for the $4.8 trillion global information technology ecosystem; and the millions of technology and business professionals who design, implement, manage, and safeguard the technology that powers the U.S. economy. Through education, training, certifications, advocacy, philanthropy, and market research, CompTIA is the hub for advancing the tech industry and its workforce. Visit www.comptia.org to learn more.

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