CompTIA launches online testing for its industry-leading certification exams

Testing and scheduling available today 

CompTIAthe leading provider of vendor-neutral skills certifications and training for information technology (IT) professionals around the world, has launched an “anytime, anywhere” online testing option for its certification exams. 

CompTIA is collaborating with Pearson VUE, the global leader in computer-based testing, to make its exams available via Pearson VUE’s OnVUE online proctoring solution. 

Todd Thibodeaux, president and CEO, CompTIA, said, “Current and prospective IT professionals, students, career changers and others whose plans have been put on hold due to the COVID-19 pandemic can resume their studies and schedule their exams with the full confidence that we’re here when they’re ready to take their test.  

“They’ll do so on a platform that delivers a rich user experience and robust security protection, all from the privacy and security of their home. This is a great advancement for our global certification program. We’re extremely pleased to work with our longtime partner Pearson VUE to deliver online testing to candidates around the world.” 

Online testing is ideal because it lets certification candidates: 

  • Test from anywhere, especially from the security and privacy of their own home or from any private area. 
  • Test anytime, so candidates can schedule their exam according to their schedule to avoid competing priorities and conflicts. 
  • Test in a highly secure environment, because Pearson VUE’s OnVUE remote proctoring ensures all candidates test under the same secure monitoring conditions as a test centre. 

Online tests may be scheduled for all CompTIA certifications except for CompTIA Certified Technical Trainer (CTT+). 

Getting ready to test  

 It takes just a few simple steps to prepare to take a CompTIA certification exam online. 

  1. Review testing policies and procedure, including CompTIA Testing Policies, the CompTIA Candidate Agreement and Pearson OnVUE Testing Policies. 
  1. Run a system test using the same computer and network that you will use to take your exam. To avoid delays and added stress during your testing appointment, complete the system test prior to the start of your exam appointment.  
  1. Create a Pearson VUE testing account (if you don’t already have one). 
  1. Schedule and complete your online exam.  

The online testing option for CompTIA exams is available in English, around the world, with the following exceptions: China, Cuba, Japan, Iran, North Korea, South Korea, Sudan, Syria, and Slovenia. 

CompTIA will continue to offer both online testing and taking a certification exam in a test centre once those facilities are cleared to reopen for business based on guidance from local governments and health authorities.  

ENDS 

About CompTIA  

The Computing Technology Industry Association (CompTIA) is a leading voice and advocate for the $5.2 trillion global information technology ecosystem; and the estimated 75 million industry and tech professionals who design, implement, manage, and safeguard the technology that powers the world’s economy. Through education, training, certifications, advocacy, philanthropy, and market research, CompTIA is the hub for advancing the tech industry and its workforce. Visit www.comptia.org to learn more. 

CompTIA launches COVID-19 Resources Forum to serve tech community

CompTIAthe leading trade association for the global information technology (IT) industry, announced the launch of the COVID-19 Resources Forum, an interactive online forum to serve technology companies and professionals as well as government agencies during the ongoing pandemic. 

The forum (covid19.comptia.orglets users  share valuable information, resources and best practices on how technology organisations of all sizes are coping with the impact COVID-19 is having on business operations. The forum also serves as a place to ask questions, list or learn about events and programs, and benefit from ideas and processes that are working for other tech professionals and businesses. 

Nancy Hammervik, executive vice president for industry relationsCompTIA, said,  “CompTIA is committed to helping the technology community stay connected and in step with each other by providing continued access to peers, business insight, useful tools and the resources organisations need to navigate the current environment.  

Users can post information about how the technology industry is responding to the public health crisis, details of philanthropic and community service efforts, and tips and tricks to improve remote working. There are also international resources, a listing of virtual industry events, and sections to ask questions of other users and industry experts. 

Technology companies that work with local, state and federal government agencies also can share information and resources specific to the public sector on the forum. CompTIA’s state and federal advocacy team is sharing details directly from government resources on the forum as well. 

Nancy Hammervik said, “Our members and the technology industry are doing incredible work in communities around the world and we want to make sure they have a platform to share best practices, success stories and valuable resources. The technology industry has stepped up and answered the call on so many levels and we want to empower professionals and companies to continue to serve their customers and the public.” 

All content posted to the COVID-19 Resources Forum is moderated by CompTIA, which reserves the right to remove any postings that do not adhere to the user guidelines.  

ENDS 

About CompTIA 

The Computing Technology Industry Association (CompTIA) is a leading voice and advocate for the $5.2 trillion global information technology ecosystem; and the estimated 75 million industry and tech professionals who design, implement, manage, and safeguard the technology that powers the world’s economy. Through education, training, certifications, advocacy, philanthropy, and market research, CompTIA is the hub for advancing the tech industry and its workforce. Visit www.comptia.org to learn more. 

Plan a career in technology with My IT Path from CompTIA

Free resource from leading technology industry association features comprehensive information on in-demand employment opportunities 

Sydney  Step-by-step guidance on planning a career in information technology (IT) is available via a new free resource from CompTIA, the leading trade association for the global IT industry. 

My IT Path delivers an interactivepersonalised experience for anyone interested in learning about careers in the IT field. 

Ryan Blankenship, vice president for content and learning at CompTIA, said, Students who are beginning their career considerations; seasoned tech professionals looking to take the next step up; workers in other industries looking to make a career change; members of the armed forces planning to return to the civilian workforce; and anyone else with an interest in technology jobs can explore their options by visiting My IT Path.”    

The site features comprehensive information for five IT occupation categoriessupportnetworkingcybersecuritydata and software and web development. Each category includes a description of specific job rolesVisitors can explore the occupations at the beginnerintermediate and advanced career levels, including details on skill requirements, median salaries and the availability of jobs and relevant professional certifications. 

Ryan Blankenship said, “We built this career road map to help demystify how to get into IT. There are immediate openings for entry-level positions that often have above-average starting salaries and real opportunities for long-term career growth.” 

The demand for IT professionals remains strong in many markets around the world in the tech sector and in other industries, such as financial services, manufacturing, healthcare, government, education and retail. 

Ryan Blankenship said, Careers in IT should be particularly attractive to young people having second thoughts about the cost of a four-year university education and the post-graduation student loan debtUnlike other industries entry-level IT jobs do not require university degreeMany companies have openly stated that skills and abilities are what really matter. IT certifications, such as those offered by CompTIA, are a proven and economical way to validate skills.” 

To learn more about IT career options and how CompTIA can help get you started visit https://www.comptia.org/content/it-careers-path-roadmap/. 

END 

About CompTIA  

The Computing Technology Industry Association (CompTIA) is a leading voice and advocate for the $5.2 trillion global information technology ecosystem; and the estimated 75 million industry and tech professionals who design, implement, manage, and safeguard the technology that powers the world’s economy. Through education, training, certifications, advocacy, philanthropy, and market research, CompTIA is the hub for advancing the tech industry and its workforce. Visit www.comptia.org to learn more. 

CompTIA announces new Executive Council members for 2020

CompTIA, the leading trade association for the global technology industry, has announced that three new executive council (EC) members have joined its ANZ Channel Community. The newly-elected members, decided on by a vote by CompTIA Premier Members, are:

  1. Nicole Freeman, ANZ lead consumer and device sales, Microsoft
  2. Chris Eaton, head of business development, Acurus
  3. Tony Heywood, VP of ANZ, Tradewinds Technology Brokerage

Moheb Moses, director, Channel Dynamics, and ANZ community director, CompTIA, said, “The goal for the EC this year is to grow our members and community, particularly in Melbourne and New Zealand. We also want to enhance our community meetings and add more value to members between meetings; increase our member engagement; continue with our IT Fundamentals initiative to train and certify 3,000 students in the fundamentals of technology in Australia and New Zealand; and promote engagement and collaboration with CompTIA communities worldwide to bring the best of the best to members in this region.

“The new group of EC members will take a collaborate approach to these initiatives and has a great network, which can be leveraged to grow the community. We would also like to take the opportunity to thank the outgoing EC members for their contribution.”

Nicole Freeman said, “I’m very passionate about this industry we all work in and I’m thrilled to be a part of the CompTIA ANZ Channel Community EC. As an active member I’ve personally thrived within the community through connections made and the benefits it provides so helping to spread the word, including embracing more of a millennial audience, is something I can’t wait to do. Attracting, retaining and developing millennial talent so they can thrive in this IT landscape so many of us enjoy today is crucial for our industry so I can’t wait to see what new ideas and concepts we can all bring to life this year.

Tony Heywood said, “I am delighted to be given the opportunity to serve the ANZ Channel Community in this capacity.  I see opportunity for greater participation in our forums, but also to further diversify the ANZ community members and create opportunities for the industry to invest in the development of young, local professionals to participate in the IT industry.”

Outgoing EC members are:

  1. Craig Somerville, managing director and CEO, Somerville Group
  2. Grant Cleary, senior marketing and business development leader, Australian Industry Group
  3. Lee Welch, director of cloud services ANZ, Ingram Micro
  4. Ronnie Altit, CEO and co-founder, Insentra

-ENDS-

 About CompTIA

The Computing Technology Industry Association (CompTIA) is a leading voice and advocate for the $5 trillion global information technology ecosystem; and the more than 75 million industry and tech professionals who design, implement, manage, and safeguard the technology that powers the world’s economy. Through education, training, certifications, advocacy, philanthropy, and market research, CompTIA is the hub for advancing the tech industry and its workforce. Visit www.comptia.org to learn more.

Emerging technology innovation assessment tool available from CompTIA

Free resource helps businesses evaluate their readiness for new innovations

Businesses can assess their readiness to use new and emerging technologies with the help of a new free online resource from CompTIA, the leading trade association for the global information technology (IT) industry.

Created by the CompTIA Emerging Technology Community, the Emerging Technology Innovation Assessment helps businesses examine the areas of their operations that are necessary to take advantage of new innovations and to identify what steps are needed to ensure that they are ready to expand their business.

Michael Haines, director of partner incentive strategy and program design at Microsoft and chair of the CompTIA Emerging Technology Community, said, “The excitement generated by new business technology solutions is often tempered by uncertainty over whether a company has the pieces in place to support them. The assessment we’ve created provides decision-makers with the information they’ll need to determine their organisation’s state of readiness to leverage new innovations.”

The Emerging Technology Innovation Assessment asks businesses to self-evaluate themselves in three areas.

  1. Does the organisation have a company culture that fosters an innovative environment built around investment, leadership commitment and employee collaboration and empowerment?
  2. Is an organisational infrastructure of strategy, vision, alignment, adoption and communication in place to support the adoption of new innovations?
  3. Do the daily activities of the business provide employees with the freedom to work in new ways and create different business outcomes?

Each of these categories is scored on a 0-15 scale to determine the company’s readiness for innovation. Strengths, weaknesses and recommendations for next steps are included in the synopsis that each company receives upon completing the assessment.

Recent research from CompTIA finds that a majority of executives (54 per cent) have a positive view of emerging technologies, while 21 per cent expressed equal parts excitement and trepidation.[1] Budget constraints, risk aversion, the lack of a clear business case and confusion about available options are the primary factors that are causing some organisations to take a go-slow approach.

Maddy Martin, head of growth and education for Smith.ai and vice chair of the CompTIA Emerging Technology Community, said, “Customer confusion and uncertainty is understandable given the dizzying speed of innovation and the proliferation of technology options. We believe the innovation assessment tool can being some clarity to the conversation about business and emerging tech.”

The CompTIA Emerging Technology Innovation Assessment is available at https://surveys.comptia.org/s3/Emerging-Tech-Assessment-Grid.

CompTIA’s Emerging Technology Community leverages the collective expertise and wisdom of its members to help businesses navigate the complex terrain of emerging solutions by identifying the most impactful near-term technologies and how they can be profitably leveraged in their business. Visit https://www.comptia.org/membership/communities-and-councils/emerging-technology-community for more information and to learn how you can get involved.

-END-

 About CompTIA

The Computing Technology Industry Association (CompTIA) is a leading voice and advocate for the $5.2 trillion global information technology ecosystem; and the estimated 75 million industry and tech professionals who design, implement, manage, and safeguard the technology that powers the world’s economy. Through education, training, certifications, advocacy, philanthropy, and market research, CompTIA is the hub for advancing the tech industry and its workforce. Visit www.comptia.org to learn more.

References: 

[1] CompTIA, International Trends in Technology and Workforce, https://www.comptia.org/content/research/international-trends-workforce-cybersecurity-emerging-tech

Business enthusiasm over innovation and emerging tech tempered by cybersecurity and workforce concerns, new CompTIA report reveals

Businesses in Australia identify innovation as a top priority and are intrigued by the potential of emerging technologies, according to a new report from CompTIA, the leading trade association for the global information technology (IT) industry.

At the same time, concerns about cybersecurity readiness and the struggle to find enough workers with the right skills to meet their workforce needs add a measure of caution to their expectations and plans for 2020, CompTIA’s “International Trends in Technology and Workforce” finds.

The survey of business and technology professionals in Australia and 13 other countries identified business priorities for 2020, as well as perceptions of emerging technologies, cybersecurity, workforce skills, professional development strategies, and the future of work.

Tim Herbert, executive vice president for research and market intelligence, CompTIA, said, “The ingredients for innovation have never been more accessible, and tech hubs can now be found in nearly every corner of the globe. While the research points to momentum on many fronts, there remains much work to be done in helping businesses and workers navigate the path ahead.”

The business of technology

With global spending on hardware, software, services and telecom projected to reach nearly $5.2 trillion globally this year, with $93 billion in Australia alone, it’s evident that technology has a growing and integral role in business operations.(1)  95 per cent of Australian companies rate technology as a primary or secondary factor in reaching their business objectives.

The large majority of companies (87 per cent) turn to outside providers to assist with their technology requirements. Consulting and strategy services, cybersecurity, software development, web design and e-commerce and repair and maintenance are among the most common outsourced services. A majority of companies (62 per cent) also report that they get excellent or good return on investment (ROI) from their technology spending.

Emerging tech momentum builds

One half of Australian businesses have a positive view of emerging technology, while another 18 per cent take a middle-ground position, expressing equal parts excitement and trepidation. Both percentages are slightly lower than the global results (54 per cent mostly excitement, 21 per cent equal parts excitement and trepidation).

At the other end of the spectrum one in three Australian companies report mostly feelings of trepidation about emerging tech. Risk aversion, budget constraints and a lack of a clear business case are among the primary factors that are causing some organisations to take a go-slow approach.

Although still far from mainstream adoption, the emerging technologies with the highest rates of implementation globally are the Internet of Things and big data.

Cybersecurity disconnects

Nearly 7 in 10 firms describe their cybersecurity as completely or mostly satisfactory. This indicates much room for improvement, especially with the remainder describing their firms’ approach as simply adequate or inadequate. For many companies in Australia the perception that current cybersecurity efforts are “good enough” is the top challenge to devoting more attention and resources to the issue. A lack of understanding of new cybersecurity threats is another challenge for companies. Given the projected high growth rates for emerging technologies expected over the next several years, the need for businesses to re-evaluate their approaches to cybersecurity is even more apparent.

Workforce challenges

Skills gaps remain an ongoing challenge at most organisations, with 46 per cent of Australian firms reporting that situation has grown more challenging over the past two years. That’s the same percentage as the corresponding global result.

The research confirms the distinction between the generic use of the phrase “skills gap” and the more nuanced discussion of “workforce gaps” that encompass location, pay, soft skills, perceptions, innovation and more.

Interestingly, 18 per cent of Australian employers acknowledge that unrealistic expectations with skills and experience contribute to exaggerated perceptions of the skills gap. Another 53 per cent acknowledge it is somewhat of a factor.

CompTIA’s “International Trends in Technology and Workforce” report is the result of an online survey of 1,554 business and technology professionals in Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, India, Ireland, Japan, the Middle East (Oman, Saudi Arabia and United Arab Emirates), the Netherlands, Thailand, the United Kingdom, and the United States. The complete report, including country specific data, is available at https://www.comptia.org/content/research/international-trends-workforce-cybersecurity-emerging-tech.

-END-

About CompTIA

The Computing Technology Industry Association (CompTIA) is a leading voice and advocate for the $5.2 trillion global information technology ecosystem; and the estimated 75 million industry and tech professionals who design, implement, manage, and safeguard the technology that powers the world’s economy. Through education, training, certifications, advocacy, philanthropy, and market research, CompTIA is the hub for advancing the tech industry and its workforce. Visit www.comptia.org to learn more.

References: 

(1) International Data Corporation (IDC), ICT Spending Forecast, https://www.idc.com/promo/global-ict-spending/forecast

CompTIA IT Industry Outlook 2020: ‘Tricky balancing act’ ahead as industry enters a new decade

Leading industry association project 3.7 per cent industry growth in 2020; identifies 10 trends to watch in the year ahead

The global information technology (IT) industry heads into 2020 balancing its drive to produce new products and services while addressing issues that are often byproducts of innovation, according to the IT Industry Outlook 2020 report from CompTIA, the industry’s leading trade association.

Moving past the hype surrounding emerging technologies and honing in on value-driven real business use cases; making cybersecurity a top of mind business consideration rather than a technology task; and melding artificial intelligence and automation into the workplace without eliminating the human element are just some of the challenges ahead for the industry identified in the CompTIA report.

CompTIA projects the global IT industry will grow at a rate of 3.7 per cent in 2020, with upside potential in the 5.4 per cent range and a downside floor of 1.9 per cent.

Seth Robinson, senior director and industry analysis, CompTIA said, “This is a narrower forecast range than what we’ve seen in past years, suggesting industry executives are exercising a relatively high degree of caution in an unpredictable environment.”

CompTIA uses a consensus forecasting approach. This “wisdom of the crowds” model attempts to balance the opinions of large IT firms with small IT firms, as well as optimistic opinions with pessimistic opinions, to come up with a “best-fit forecast” that reflects the sentiment of industry executives.

CompTIA’s 10 trends to watch in 2020

CompTIA’s IT Industry Outlook 2020 also provides insight into 10 trends that will shape the IT industry, its workforce, and its business models in the coming year.

1. Tech-washing fades in favor of real strategy
2. Workforce diversity grows in many ways
3. Tech topics are front and centre in U.S. elections
4. Hype meets reality with emerging technology
5. Internet of Things continues to redefine IT architecture
6. Artificial intelligence eats the world
7. Demand for integration leads to demand for automation
8. Cybersecurity becomes more operational
9. Deep fakes and 5G exacerbate the data management challenge
10. Tech industry regulation stirs fears

Seth Robinson said, “Trends tend to unfold in a step-like manner. Some of the trends we’ve highlighted are in their early stages while others are approaching market-ready maturity. Similarly, any single trend will impact organisations at different times and in different ways.”

The view from the IT channel

Companies involved in the selling of technology products and services can anticipate another year of change and complexity in 2020. Factors that have altered the selling and buying process over the last several years (competition from new market entrants, more options for customers to choose from) will remain in play.

Carolyn April, senior director and industry analysis, CompTIA said, “The channel firms that manage to thrive will be the ones who invest in skills training, expand their market reach to new customers and verticals, partner with potential competitors, and embrace emerging tech. For many, this will mean getting out of their comfort zone.”

IT pros optimistic

IT professionals head into the new year with optimistic feelings about their roles in the industry. Among IT pros in Australia and New Zealand, 82 per cent rate their outlook as good or very good. Technology workers in other countries and regions expressed similar positive sentiments: 81 per cent in Canada, 75 per cent in the United Kingdom, 86 per cent in the United States and 85 per cent in the Benelux region (Belgium/Netherlands/Luxembourg).

The high demand for technology skills, which in turn leads to robust career options, is the top reason for optimism. There’s also a sense that the importance of technology to business objectives makes technology a more integral part of business operations, giving IT pros an opportunity to play a larger role in the direction of the organisation.

The complete IT Industry Outlook 2020 report is available at https://www.comptia.org/content/research/it-industry-trends-analysis. For all the latest news from CompTIA visit https://www.comptia.org/newsroom.

-ENDS-

About CompTIA
The Computing Technology Industry Association (CompTIA) is a leading voice and advocate for the $5 trillion global information technology ecosystem; and the more than 50 million industry and tech professionals who design, implement, manage, and safeguard the technology that powers the world’s economy. Through education, training, certifications, advocacy, philanthropy, and market research, CompTIA is the hub for advancing the tech industry and its workforce. Visit www.comptia.org to learn more.

New CompTIA Report tracks Australian teenagers’ thoughts on technology usage and careers

Nearly half of teens say they would consider a career in tech, but perceived barriers and lack of career information persist

Sydney – New research published by CompTIA, the leading trade association for the global technology industry, finds that teenagers in Australia believe that technology is generally moving in a positive direction and is a force for good that will play an even greater role in their lives as they grow older.

The CompTIA report “International Youth Perspectives of Technology and Careers” reveals that 45 per cent of the Australian teenagers surveyed would consider a career in technology, compared to 50 per cent globally. Australian teens are generally positive about what a job in tech entails; solving problems, doing work that’s interesting and fun and earning a good salary.

But the survey also finds that barriers are still in place that may be keeping even more young people from looking at the technology field as a profession. More than 1,500 teenagers between the ages of 13 and 18 from 11 different countries (1) participated in the online survey.

“It’s encouraging to see that a sizeable percentage of young people see tech as a viable career option,” said Todd Thibodeaux, president and CEO, CompTIA. “But it’s also quite apparent that we still have work to do to correct misperceptions about tech occupations and to provide career instruction and resources that reflect the reality of the 21st Century tech workforce.”

For example, the data shows that 35 per cent of Australian teenagers are of the opinion that they lack the preparation and exposure to technology in high school or college that would prepare them for a career. A like percentage believe there are limited job opportunities in technology in their local area. Slightly more than one-quarter of teens cite the lack of affordable schooling and training options; and feel the technology field is too competitive and difficult to enter.

The report also confirms that gender bias is still present when it comes to career advice. Boys in Australia received notably higher levels of encouragement from parents, teachers, peers and other to consider a career in tech than girls did (55 per cent vs. 33 per cent).

When teens were asked about specific career opportunities in tech, the most popular choices were designing video games, working in emerging technologies, such as robotics, running a tech business and working in cybersecurity.

“These are all great career choices, but there are many more job roles in tech that provide the opportunity to earn a good salary, take on new and greater responsibilities and, most importantly, have a positive impact on society,” Thibodeaux said. “We need to expand our outreach to get that message out to the next generations of workers.”

To aid in the education effort, CompTIA has created The Future of Tech, a free and growing library of resources designed for anyone interested in learning about new and what’s next in technology.

CompTIA’s Australia New Zealand (ANZ) Channel Community also recently launched a new initiative to train and certify 3,000 students in the fundamentals of technology. Free courseware materials and certification exam vouchers will be made available to 3,000 students age 25 and under in Australia and New Zealand. More information on the program is available at https://www.land.certification.comptia.org/ITFANZ.

Interacting with technology

Among Australian teenagers, 54 per cent generally believe that technology in a positive direction compared to 13 per cent who feel that tech is heading in a negative direction and 33 per cent who are unsure. The corresponding global figures are 54 per cent positive, 11 per cent negative and 35 per cent unsure.

Factors contributing to the positive feelings include the expectations that innovation and technology breakthroughs could drastically improve lives; offer more choices to meet the needs of just about everyone; produce apps and devices that are faster, better and more feature rich; and narrow the “digital divide” by providing access to more information and services to more people.

A majority of young people (69 per cent) report seeing or hearing something about automating technologies and the future of work. They also expressed a degree of concern over the uncertainty of automation.

“Teens astutely anticipate the need for more training and hands-on experience in various technology disciplines to ensure that they are well positioned for the workplace of tomorrow,” said Anna Matthai, senior manager, research and market intelligence, CompTIA.

To access a free copy of the full report “International Youth Perspectives of Technology and Careers” visit https://comptiacdn.azureedge.net/webcontent/docs/default-source/research-reports/comptia-international-youth-technology-and-career-perceptions.pdf?sfvrsn=f0dfb41e_2.

-ENDS-

About CompTIA
The Computing Technology Industry Association (CompTIA) is a leading voice and advocate for the $5 trillion global information technology ecosystem; and the more than 50 million industry and tech professionals who design, implement, manage, and safeguard the technology that powers the world’s economy. Through education, training, certifications, advocacy, philanthropy, and market research, CompTIA is the hub for advancing the tech industry and its workforce. Visit www.comptia.org to learn more.

References: 

(1) Australia, Brazil, Canada, India, Japan, Netherlands, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom and United States.

CompTIA and its ANZ Channel Community launch major new initiative to teach students the fundamentals of technology

 

Association will provide 3,000 students with free training and certification exam vouchers

Sydney, AustraliaCompTIA, the leading trade association for the global technology industry, and its Australia New Zealand (ANZ) Channel Community are expanding its commitment to the region with a new initiative to train and certify 3,000 students in the fundamentals of technology.

Free courseware materials and certification exam vouchers will be made available to 3,000 students age 25 and under in Australia and New Zealand. The goal is to have the students become certified in CompTIA IT Fundamentals, a pre-career professional certification that introduces them to basic technology knowledge and skills to help them decide if a career in tech is right for them.

“From day one our commitment has been to work with the technology community across the region to help the industry advance, companies grow and individuals thrive in their careers,” said Nancy Hammervik, executive vice president for industry relations at CompTIA. “Today we’re taking the next step; to bring a new generation of entrepreneurs, innovators and technologists into our community.”

Members of the CompTIA ANZ Channel Community will leverage their professional networks to bring students and educational institutions into the program. CompTIA partners are also encouraged to get involved, as are individual students. More information on the program is available at https://www.land.certification.comptia.org/ITFANZ.

“The technology field is rich with career opportunities, whether you work for an ICT company or in another industry that relies on tech to conduct its business,” said James Bergl, APAC regional director for Datto, a leading provider of IT solutions delivered by managed service providers and chair of the CompTIA ANZ Channel Community.

“But getting that message out to young people who are beginning to think about their career options has been a major challenge for our industry,” Bergl continued. “Our free training and certification program will address that issue head on.”

“This campaign comes at a crucial time for our industry,” added Daniel Johns, head of services for ASI Solutions, a leading Australian privately-owned ICT company and vice chair of the CompTIA community. “Companies continue to seek out new tech talent to fill existing employment shortages and to expand into new areas of emerging technologies.”

In Australia, government research shows an annual increase of 21.5 percent in the demand for information and communications technology professionals; some 11,600 job openings per year.

Similarly, the tech industry is a major and growing sector in New Zealand, with exports reaching $950 million in 2016 and the industry growing at an estimated 12 percent per year.

Eligible students who participate in the program will receive free video training and a self-study e-book, as well as a complimentary exam voucher to take the test to become certified in CompTIA IT Fundamentals.

“The CompTIA IT Fundamentals curriculum allows students to explore the foundations of technology, creating a better understanding and mastery of basic digital skills,” said Loraine Vorster, vice president for business development at CompTIA. “For some, this will serve as a launching pad for a career in tech. Others will be well grounded in the fundamentals of tech that will serve them well in any career they choose to pursue.”

Students interested in the program can apply at: https://www.land.certification.comptia.org/ITFANZ.

-END-

About CompTIA
The Computing Technology Industry Association (CompTIA) is a leading voice and advocate for the $5 trillion global information technology ecosystem; and the more than 50 million industry and tech professionals who design, implement, manage, and safeguard the technology that powers the world’s economy. Through education, training, certifications, advocacy, philanthropy, and market research, CompTIA is the hub for advancing the tech industry and its workforce. Visit www.comptia.org to learn more.

CompTIA IT Industry Outlook 2019: ‘Next Big Thing’ gives way to fusion of technology building blocks, people and processes

CompTIA IT Industry Outlook 2019: ‘Next big thing’ gives way to fusion of technology building blocks, people and processes

Leading tech industry trade association projects four per cent industry growth in 2019; identifies 12 trends to watch

Sydney, Australia – The pace, scope, and accessibility of innovation today provides organisations an ever-expanding array of digital transformation tools; but it also brings new challenges in orchestrating technology, people, and process. This is one of the key themes explored in the “IT Industry Outlook 2019,” the annual report published by CompTIA, the leading association for the global tech industry.

On the strength of this innovation, CompTIA projects global industry growth of 4 per cent, with upside potential of 6.4 per cent. Conversely, an economic slowdown, exacerbated by international trade turmoil, could push the growth forecast to its low-end projection of 1.5 per cent.

“It’s an exciting time as we embark on the next wave of innovation. Technology is more accessible than ever; and there are more opportunities to use technology to build and grow organisations,” said Todd Thibodeaux, president and CEO, CompTIA.

“While the potential is great, the challenges and anxieties are great, too,” Thibodeaux continued. “Our mission is to work with the tech community, and the workforce of today and tomorrow, to turn the possibilities of innovation into the realities of real-word benefits for the users of technology.”

Among factors cited by industry executives surveyed by CompTIA that will help drive growth in the year ahead is their ability to reach new customer segments, and successfully selling new business lines and launching new products, such as in emerging technology areas.

CompTIA’s IT Industry Business Confidence Index remains in solidly positive territory, but there are a number of concerns on the minds of industry executives. Beyond the usual concern over customer spending weakness, executives cited the possibility of an unexpected shock, such as a financial crisis, government turmoil, and margin pressure as factors that could hinder growth.

CompTIA’s 12 trends to watch in 2019

CompTIA’s ‘IT Industry Outlook 2019’ explores 12 trends shaping the tech landscape, its workforce, and its business models in the year ahead.

1. Cloud, edge and 5G form the modern economic infrastructure
2. IoT and AI open new possibilities in ambient computing
3. Distributed technology models challenge existing structures
4. Stackable technologies supercharge digitisation efforts
5. Business of emerging technology prompts sales channels reinvention
6. Hyper-personalisation takes customer experience to next level
7. Partnerships bridge gaps in new tech ecosystem
8. Persistent tech-worker shortages fuel new, creative solutions
9. Digital-human models begin to shape the workplace of tomorrow
10. Technology professionals take the lead in anticipating unintended consequences
11. High tech increasingly transforms low tech
12. Global tech hubs put spotlight on the ingredients for innovation

“This year’s trends reaffirm the importance of thinking about technology holistically,” said Tim Herbert, senior vice president for research and market intelligence at CompTIA. “While discussions of ‘the next big thing have their place, the practical reality for most organisations is the need to understand how technology building blocks spanning infrastructure, applications, data, and as-a-service models fit together.”

The complete report is available at https://www.comptia.org/resources/it-industry-trends-analysis.

About CompTIA
The Computing Technology Industry Association (CompTIA) is a leading voice and advocate for the $5 trillion global information technology ecosystem; and the more than 50 million industry and tech professionals who design, implement, manage, and safeguard the technology that powers the world’s economy. Through education, training, certifications, advocacy, philanthropy, and market research, CompTIA is the hub for advancing the tech industry and its workforce.